RongRong & Inri



After studying painting and then photography in Fujian province, RongRong (b. 1968) joined the East Village art community in Peking, home of the entire avant-garde of the period in a totally marginal social context. There he photographed the daily life of his friends, known for performances that pushed their naked bodies to the limits of endurance. After East Village was shut down by the authorities, RongRong created the series Ruins, on the demolition of Peking's urban landscape.
Born in 1973, the photographer inri brings a near-ferocious intensity to works on the far fringes of the conventional. In 1999 Rong Rong met Inri, a Japanese artist, at his solo exhibition in Tokyo. Although they did not understand each other’s languages at that time, they communicated with each other using art as their common language. Built on the foundation of their individual styles, their collaborative works surpass the limits of their individual vision.


Since 2000 they have been living and working together in Peking. Rong Rong and Inri's works reflect the intimate world that they have created together, while pushing the boundaries of traditional black-and-white darkroom techniques. Their critically acclaimed photographs focus on the beauty of the human being in nature and the urban environment. Both are fascinated by the changing world around them, seeking harmony between their bodies and nature as they photograph themselves naked in extreme conditions: snow, ice and the burning heat of the desert. Their series include In the Great Wall, In Bad Goysern and In Helsinki and in tandem they have published Transfiguration (2003) and Liu Li Tun (2005). Liu Li Tun could be described as their first work, as it contains photos dating notably from their first years together. Some of these photos were shown in Peking and New York in 2006.
In 2006, the couple founded the first non-profit photography art center in China, the Three Shadows Photography Art Center in Beijing's Caochangdi art district. With exhibition galleries, a contemporary art library, dark rooms, and an international artist in residence program, Three Shadows aims to be the most professional and comprehensive platform for the promotion of photography and video art in the country.
In 2006, the couple founded the first non-profit photography art center in China, the Three Shadows Photography Art Center in Beijing's Caochangdi art district. With exhibition galleries, a contemporary art library, dark rooms, and an international artist in residence program, Three Shadows aims to be the most professional and comprehensive platform for the promotion of photography and video art in the country.
In 2007 They started the annual Three Shadows Photography Award to discover and encourage China’s most promising photographers. RongRong and Inri’s recent work brings attention to the beauty and value of new beginnings in their shared life and surroundings, especially amidst a rapidly changing world







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