He Sen



He Sen emerged during China’s post-Cultural Revolution years of the early 1990s. Initially painting still-life images of objects that epitomized the nation's growing consumer culture, including toys and western music, he eventually began to include figures in his work, creating provocative, large-scale works that considered the effects of global consumerism on Chinese youth.  He Sen’s latest series of photorealist images depicting young Chinese women with stuffed animals continues this exploration
He Sen has been painting young women and soft toys since 1998. The presence of teddy bears aims to create a tension between a certain childishness and the paraphernalia of adulthood that surround the girls. Eyes are significant to He: his first paintings in this series featured young women whose eyes were rubbed out, blurring their expressions. More recently He has chosen to represent the eyes of the young women he paints, and their bored, melancholy or occasionally smiling expressions are rendered in detail. The "blurring" previously attained by the erasing of the eyes can now be seen in the blue-grey cigarette smoke that curls around their heads, or the shadows cast on the monochrome grey background. The soft toys still feature at times, negating the self-consciously grown-up poses of the models. Heavily made up and often provocative, He Sen's young women seem to be caught between childhood and fully fledged adult life
He Sen has been painting young women and soft toys since 1998. The presence of teddy bears aims to create a tension between a certain childishness and the paraphernalia of adulthood that surround the girls. Eyes are significant to He: his first paintings in this series featured young women whose eyes were rubbed out, blurring their expressions. More recently He has chosen to represent the eyes of the young women he paints, and their bored, melancholy or occasionally smiling expressions are rendered in detail. The "blurring" previously attained by the erasing of the eyes can now be seen in the blue-grey cigarette smoke that curls around their heads, or the shadows cast on the monochrome grey background. The soft toys still feature at times, negating the self-consciously grown-up poses of the models. Heavily made up and often provocative, He Sen's young women seem to be caught between childhood and fully fledged adult life.



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